Baby Boomers will grow the "senior" population from 12% to 22%

(double the burden and cost of end-of-life care issues)





For the purposes of this list "Western world" can be taken to mean North America, Europe, South America, and Oceania. However, it should also be noted that many variations may exist within the regions, both geographically and culturally which mean that the list is broadly indicative, but necessarily very general. For details see the individual articles.


  • The Lost Generation, also known as the Generation of 1914 in Europe,[18] is a term originating with Gertrude Stein to describe those who fought in World War I. The members of the lost generation were typically born between 1883 and 1900.
  • The Silent Generation, also known as the "Lucky Few", were born 1925 through 1942. It includes those who were too young to jointhe service during World War II. It includes most of those who fought the Korean War and many during the Vietnam War.

  • Describing the book the publisher writes: The "Lucky Few became the first American generation smaller than the one before them, and the luckiest generation of Americans ever. As children they experienced the most stable intact parental families in the nation’s history. Lucky Few women married earlier than any other generation of the century and helped give birth to the Baby Boom, yet also gained in education compared to earlier generations. Lucky Few men made the greatest gains of the century in schooling, earned veterans benefits like the Greatest Generation but served mostly in peacetime with only a fraction of the casualties, came closest to full employment, and spearheaded the trend toward earlier retirement. More than any other generation, Lucky Few men advanced into professional and white-collar jobs while Lucky Few women concentrated in mostly pink collar work. Even in retirement and old age the Lucky Few remain in the right place at the right time".[5]

    In GenerationsWilliam Strauss and Neil Howe define the Silents / Lucky Few as an Artist/Adaptive generation. An Artist (or Adaptive) generation is born during a Crisis, spends its rising adult years in a new High, spends midlife in an Awakening, and spends old age in an Unraveling. Artistic leaders have been advocates of fairness and the politics of inclusion, irrepressible in the wake of failure.



  • The Lucky Few enjoyed higher employment rates than preceding and following generations. Now between ages 63 and 79, this generation is enjoying better health and retiring earlier.
  • http://www.prb.org/Publications/Articles/2008/luckyfew.aspx


  • The Baby Boomers are the generation that was born following World War II, generally from 1943 up to the early 1960s, a time that was marked by an increase in birth rates. The term "baby boomer" is sometimes used in a cultural context. Therefore, it is impossible to achieve broad consensus of a precise date definition.[21] The baby boom has been described variously as a "shockwave"[22] and as "the pig in the python."[23] In general, baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values; however, many commentators have disputed the extent of that rejection, noting the widespread continuity of values with older and younger generations. In Europe and North America boomers are widely associated with privilege, as many grew up in a time of affluence.[22] One of the features of Boomers was that they tended to think of themselves as a special generation, very different from those that had come before them. In the 1960s, as the relatively large numbers of young people became teenagers and young adults, they, and those around them, created a very specific rhetoric around their cohort, and the change they were bringing about.[24]
  • Generation Z is a name used for the cohort of people born from the early 2000s to the present day who are distinct from the preceding Millennial Generation.[31] Alternate names include:iGenerationGen TechGen WiiNet GenDigital NativesGen NextPost Gen.[31][35]

Baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values; however, many commentators have disputed the extent of that rejection, noting the widespread continuity of values with older and younger generations. In Europe and North America boomers are widely associated with privilege, as many grew up in a time of widespread government subsidies in post-war housing and education, and increasing affluence.[3]

As a group, they were the wealthiest, most active, and most physically fit generation up to that time, and amongst the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time. They were also the generation that received peak levels of income, therefore they could reap the benefits of abundant levels of food, apparel, retirement programs, and sometimes even "midlife crisis" products.

One feature of the boomers was that they tended to think of themselves as a special generation, very different from those that had come before. In the 1960s, as the relatively large numbers of young people became teenagers and young adults, they, and those around them, created a very specific rhetoric around their cohort, and the change they were bringing about.[5] This rhetoric had an important impact in the self perceptions of the boomers, as well as their tendency to define the world in terms of generations, which was a relatively new phenomenon. The baby boom has been described variously as a "shockwave"[3] and as "the pig in the python."[4]


Aging and end-of-life issues[edit]

As of 1998, it was reported that, as a generation, boomers had tended to avoid discussions and planning for their demise and avoided much long-term planning. However, beginning at least as early as that year, there has been a growing dialogue on how to manage aging and end-of-life issues as the generation ages.

 In particular, a number of commentators have argued that Baby Boomers are in a state of denial regarding their own aging and death and are leaving an undue economic burden on their children for their retirement and care. According to the 2011 Associated Press and LifeGoesStrong.com surveys:

  • 60% lost value in investments because of the economic crisis
  • 42% are delaying retirement
  • 25% claim they'll never retire (currently still working)[29][30]

In 2013, the oldest baby boomers (depending on birth years used) reached a common retirement age in the United States—67 years.

If the 1946-1964 Baby Boomer is taken, that is 18 years in total duration, 9 years would be midway point into the boom, the year 1955. The person born in 1955 reaches retirement age of 65 in the year 2020, with an expected thirteen (13) more years of life.

Financial issues[edit]

The magnitude and timing of baby boomer retirements in the developed world are anticipated to generate a number of unique financial issues:

  • Nano gap - The term "Nano gap" was coined by accounting firm Deloitte[31] to describe the shortage of private equity capital to fund the retirement of baby-boomer entrepreneurs seeking to sell their small, medium enterprises (SMEs).

Impact on history and culture[edit]

An indication of the importance put on the impact of the boomer was the selection by Time magazine of the Baby Boom Generation as its 1966 "Man of the Year". As Claire Raines points out in Beyond Generation X, “never before in history had youth been so idealized as they were at this moment”. When Generation X came along it had much to live up to in this author's opinion.[32]

Boomers are often associated with counterculture, the civil rights movement and the feminist cause of the 1970s.